Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Kitten Season

In my current work-in-progress THE BILLIONAIRE'S NANNY, my heroine is fostering a cat named Blossom. I fictionalized a real life event that happened at my local animal rescue shelter, a broken pipe flooded the cat house, in order Blossom to need a foster ASAP. But the truth is, even without a broken pipes, most shelters and rescue groups are looking for fosters.

Especially now.

This is the time of year when rescue shelters find themselves overwhelmed by kittens. Kittens are oh-so-cute, but when they are only days or weeks old, they live in foster homes. This puts a strain on shelters to find space for them. Kitten season lasts for months, so many shelters need extra fosters to get them through this crunch time.

If you've ever thought about fostering cats for a shelter or rescue group near you, now is a good time to make the call! You don't have to foster kittens. Older cats need foster homes, too. I can't speak for all shelters, but my local one provides all the supplies a foster needs, including covering medical expenses for the cat(s.) The foster provides the space and care and love. A win-win situation.

I realize some people aren't in a position to foster at the moment. One of those people is me. With two sick cats, I can't take in another right now, but we can still find ways to help. Just check in with your local rescue group to see what ideas they have on ways to get involved outside of fostering.

I know fostering doesn't appeal to everyone. I've heard the following from more than one person: how could they foster a cat, get attached then have that cat adopted by someone else. They say having to give the cat up would hurt their hearts too much. I always shake my head at this because that means these so-called cat lovers would rather protect themselves than help an animal in need. Sure, you get attached. Yes, you will miss them. And there have been lots of foster failures (raising hand, because we ended up adopting Miss Mousie.) But aren't some tears and a tight chest better than having a cat turned away from being rescued because there isn't room for them? Sure, some people will take in strays (we've done it), but adoption events and online adoption databases are better ways for a cat to find a forever home.

Every cat needs a forever home and their own person or family to love them!

And dogs, too! If you prefer woof to meow, dogs need fosters, too!



4 comments:

Quilt Lady said...

I will have to say I can't take in a cat my son has an allergy to them. He didn't when he was small because we had cats but this happen when he was around eight.

Brandy said...

I would lo e to foster, but we just don't have the room for more kitties right now. I do donate to shelters as much as we can, so for now that will have to do. Thank you for promoting Fostering!

Maria Zannini said...

With four dogs, farm animals, and the predators that go with them, it's a full time job now.

Though I can see a time we might be able to do that once I have fewer dogs and more husband around. It's a little tough all by myself.

Melissa McClone said...

This was more a PSA kind of post after seeing some heartbreaking things on Facebook! More people read this blog than comment so was hoping to let some of them know about fostering! Until I met someone who fostered kittens a few years ago I had no idea you could do that.